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St.Helens Area Profile
Moss Bank Ward (Ward)

Please note that the information in this profile will only display correctly for St.Helens. Data may be available for other local authority areas but the contextual information in the Profile is tailored to St.Helens.

Metadata

Introduction

Information such as crime rates, employment levels, health statistics and educational achievement scores, all contribute to building up a picture of the area in which we live. Such information also tells us a lot about the types of problems or concerns faced by a particular area and allows us to compare Moss Bank Ward with neighbouring areas or the regional or national average, as appropriate. Thereby allowing us to see if the issues seen are common across the wider area or specific to Moss Bank Ward. This enables us to direct resources and efforts more effectively.

This profile report summarises information for Moss Bank Ward. More detailed information can be found in the Data and Resources section. Information about Councillors representing particular Wards may be found on St.Helens Council website.

Population

Moss Bank Ward resident population is estimated at 10768 at mid-year 2015. The age structure of the Borough reflects the national trend of an ageing population.

The table below shows the population in the local area, with comparator area information where available.

Table: Total population
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Total population (2015)Total population (2015)10,768 (N/A)177,61254,501,221
MetadataLink:Total male population (% of whole population) (2015)Total male population (% of whole population) (2015)48.93 (5,269)49.149.33
MetadataLink:Total female population (% of whole population) (2015)Total female population (% of whole population) (2015)51.07 (5,499)50.950.67

Source: Office for National Statistics (ONS)

The table below shows the number of people in each broad age band, e.g. 0-15 years, working age (16-64 years) and older than 65 years.

Population by broad age band
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Population aged 0-15 (% of all people) (2015)Population aged 0-15 (% of all people) (2015)16.61 (1788)18.0719.08
MetadataLink:Population aged 16-64 (% of all people) (2015)Population aged 16-64 (% of all people) (2015)61.88 (6663)62.0163.28
MetadataLink:Population aged 65+ (% of all people) (2015)Population aged 65+ (% of all people) (2015)21.52 (2317)19.9217.73

Source: Office for National Statistics (ONS): population mid-year estimates

St. Helens is ethnically less diverse than many areas, with 98.1% of the population (Census, 2011) identifying themselves as white British, compared to 79.8% nationally and 87.1% in the North West.

St.Helens remains a strongly Christian Borough with 79.66% of Moss Bank Ward identifying themselves as Christian. This is different to the national picture, where there appears to have been a shift in religious affiliation. Although, across England as a whole Christianity remains the largest religion, with 59% of the population identifying themselves as Christians.

Health

Life Expectancy

Life Expectancy - refers the average length of time people can expect to live.

In Moss Bank Ward, men currently live on average 79.46 years and women live on average 81.99 years.

Tackling inequalities in health and improving overall health and wellbeing will reduce premature mortality and improve life expectancy. The fact that there are large differences in life expectancy has been a key driver of Government health policy.

The table below presents information on life expectancy for males and females in the local area, with Borough and national averages for comparison.

Table: Life expectancy at birth
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Male life expectancy at birth (Years) (2011-2013)Male life expectancy at birth (Years) (2011-2013)78.227678.3
MetadataLink:Female life expectancy at birth (Years) (2011-2013)Female life expectancy at birth (Years) (2011-2013)81.4680.782.3

Source: Office for National Statistics (ONS)

Disability and limiting long-term illness

This section looks at adminstrative and self-reported measures of disability and limiting-long-term illness. Levels of disability and poor health can be measured through the take-up of health related benefits from the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP), who provide benefits to support the care needs of people in a chronic state of ill health or disability. Disability and long term health issues can have a number of social exclusion implications, people with long term illness and disability can face exclusion from the labour market and may require significant support to meet their social care needs.

The table below captures self reported measures of poor health and disability from the most recent census. It shows the percentage of the resident population that self-assessed as having a limiting long-term illness.

Table: People with poor health or a limiting long-term illness
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:People with limiting long-term illness (% of all people) (2011)People with limiting long-term illness (% of all people) (2011)24.98 (2,668)22.9717.64
MetadataLink:People in not good health (% of all people) (2011)People in not good health (% of all people) (2011)9.33 (997)8.285.49

Source: Office for National Statistics - Census data

The table below shows the number and proportion of working age DWP benefit claimants who are claiming benefits for health reasons, including caring responsibilities, work limiting illness and disability

Table: DWP Benefit claimants, receiving benefits as a result of poor health or disability
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Working-age DWP benefit claimants, Carer (% of working age population) (Q04 2016)Working-age DWP benefit claimants, Carer (% of working age population) (Q04 2016)3.18 (212)2.981.69
MetadataLink:Working-age DWP benefit claimants, Disabled (% of working age population) (Q04 2016)Working-age DWP benefit claimants, Disabled (% of working age population) (Q04 2016).71 (47).96.78
MetadataLink:Working-age DWP benefit claimants, Incapacity Benefits (% of working age population) (Q04 2016)Working-age DWP benefit claimants, Incapacity Benefits (% of working age population) (Q04 2016)10.82 (721)9.45.84

Source: Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

The table below shows two key disability indicators: a) the number and proportion of older people receiving Attendance Allowance b) the number of people receiving Disability Living Allowance.

Table: Key disability indicators
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Attendance Allowance claimants (% of pensionable age population) (Q01 2017)Attendance Allowance claimants (% of pensionable age population) (Q01 2017)16.96 (393)17.0413.67
MetadataLink:Disability Living Allowance claimants (% of whole population) (Q01 2017)Disability Living Allowance claimants (% of whole population) (Q01 2017)6.38 (687)6.243.68

Source: Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

Healthy lifestyle behaviours

Encouraging a healthy lifestyle is central to improving health outcomes. High levels of smoking, obesity and alcohol consumption are likely to increase premature mortality levels. This is recognised in both national and local strategies.

The table below shows the percentage of children in reception year and year 6 who are classed as being of healthy weight, underweight, overweight including obese or obese. The data is provided as a 3 year rate.

Reception Year / Year 6 Pupils - % healthy / underweight / overweight (inc obese) / obese
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
Children in reception year
MetadataLink:% children (reception age) who are overweight (including obese) - 3 yr rate (2013/14 - 2015/16)% children (reception age) who are overweight (including obese) - 3 yr rate (2013/14 - 2015/16)28.425.422.2
MetadataLink:% children (reception age) who are obese - 3 yr rate (2013/14 - 2015/16)% children (reception age) who are obese - 3 yr rate (2013/14 - 2015/16)12.211.19.3
Children in Year 6
MetadataLink:% children (year 6) who are overweight (including obese) - 3 yr rate (2013/14 - 2015/16)% children (year 6) who are overweight (including obese) - 3 yr rate (2013/14 - 2015/16)38.325.433.4
MetadataLink:% children (year 6) who are obese - 3 yr rate (2013/14 - 2015/16)% children (year 6) who are obese - 3 yr rate (2013/14 - 2015/16)21.420.719.0

Source: National Child Measurement Programme (HSCIC).

Social Care

Informal care

The provision of care is one of the necessary consequences of ill health. This provision may be informal and unpaid (typically by other family members) or provided by the Local Authority or other organisation.

The table below shows the proportion of people who reported in the Census that they provide some form of unpaid care. St.Helens has the highest proportion of residents (12.9%) providing unpaid care in the NW and the 4th highest in England. The average for England is 10.2%.

The majority of residents report providing between 1 and 19 hours of unpaid care a week. It is evident however that there is a greater proportion of carers in St.Helens providing in excess of 20 hours plus care a week, compared to the NW and England averages. The proportion providing 50 plus hours of care a week is very high, at 3.86% of all carers.

Table: People providing unpaid care
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:People providing unpaid care, 1-19 hours per week (% of total population) (2011)People providing unpaid care, 1-19 hours per week (% of total population) (2011)7.72 (825)7.156.51
MetadataLink:People providing unpaid care, 20-49 hours per week (% of total population) (2011)People providing unpaid care, 20-49 hours per week (% of total population) (2011)2.26 (241)2.051.36
MetadataLink:People providing unpaid care, 50+ hours per week (% of total population) (2011)People providing unpaid care, 50+ hours per week (% of total population) (2011)3.86 (412)3.692.37

Source: ONS - Census

Economy and Employment

Economy

St Helens is one of five local authorities in the Merseyside region and home to 177,612 residents (ONS Mid-year estimate 2015). The Borough covers a total of 135 square kilometres, of which approximately half is rural and half is urban.

Its proud history is linked with the industrial revolution, coal mining, and a world famous glass industry, which employed many of the local residents. However, the industrialisation of the Borough and its subsequent decline from the late 1970s onwards left a legacy of issues including poor health, long-term inter-generational unemployment, low levels of enterprise and poor environmental quality of parts of the Borough.

In more recent years St Helens has seen widespread regeneration, with the positive transformation of many parts of the Borough and the development of new housing, business premises, transport facilities and green and open spaces. Yet in some respects St Helens remains a fairly typical northern town. The Borough has an aging population with growing numbers of vulnerable people requiring support. Poor health and worklessness remain key issues and there is relatively high deprivation and inequality to be found in areas of the Borough. Unemployment levels and reliance on benefits are above regional averages; whilst skill levels although improving remain comparatively low.

Despite these issues, St Helens has many strengths. The Borough enjoys a strategic position at the heart of the North West and has great potential to increase its economic growth and competitiveness. Business sectors such as logistics represent a major strength due to St Helens excellent transport network and connectivity. Self-employment levels have increased and business survival rates at 5-years are improved.

The table below provides counts of the total number of businesses above the VAT threshold (turnover of £65,000 or more) that are registered in the local area. There are more than one million businesses in the UK registered for VAT. This dataset provides an indication of business activity in an area.

Table: VAT registered enterprises: total stock
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Total stock of VAT-registered enterprises (rate per 10,000 working age people) (2014)Total stock of VAT-registered enterprises (rate per 10,000 working age people) (2014)135.5 (91)340.2565.6

Source: Business Registers Unit (BRU)

The table below shows counts of VAT registered local business units categorised by 4 employment size bands (0-4, 5-9, 10-19 and 20+ paid employees).

Table: VAT registered local units by employment sizeband
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:VAT based local units employing 0 to 4 people (% of all VAT based local units) (2016)VAT based local units employing 0 to 4 people (% of all VAT based local units) (2016)79.5 (128)64.3671.43
MetadataLink:VAT based local units employing 5 to 9 people (% of all VAT based local units) (2016)VAT based local units employing 5 to 9 people (% of all VAT based local units) (2016)4.35 (7)15.5512.94
MetadataLink:VAT based local units employing 10 to 19 people (% of all VAT based local units) (2016)VAT based local units employing 10 to 19 people (% of all VAT based local units) (2016) ()8.647.63
MetadataLink:VAT based local units employing 20 or more people (% of all VAT based local units) (2016)VAT based local units employing 20 or more people (% of all VAT based local units) (2016) ()11.467.77

Source: Business Registers Unit (BRU)

Employment

This section looks at the employment structure in the local area in terms of the economic activity levels of the population, including: levels of full time part time and self employment; the occupational category of people employed in the area; and the main industrial sector in which the workforce is employed.

The table below shows the number and proportion working age adults who are economically active, in employment or economically inactive in the local area and comparator areas. Figures are derived from responses in the Annual Population Survey, a quarterly survey of approximately 170,000 households and 360,000 persons.

The Annual Population Survey data is rolling year data reported at a point in time during the year.Please note that there is a significant lag period for the publication of data.

Table: Economic activity rate
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Economically active people of working-age (% all aged 16-64) (Jan 16-17)Economically active people of working-age (% all aged 16-64) (Jan 16-17)74.9 (5,100)74.978.1
MetadataLink:Employed people of working-age (% all aged 16-64) (Jan 16-17)Employed people of working-age (% all aged 16-64) (Jan 16-17)71.41 (4,862)71.3874.26
MetadataLink:Economically inactive people of working-age (% all aged 16-64) (Jan 16-17)Economically inactive people of working-age (% all aged 16-64) (Jan 16-17)25.24 (1,718)25.2221.87

Source: Annual Population Survey (APS)

The Census collected information about the employment status of people aged 16-74 years and the results are shown in the table below.

Table: Economic activity breakdown
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Part-time employees (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)Part-time employees (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)14.39 (1,155)14.0213.72
MetadataLink:Full-time employees (Census) (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)Full-time employees (Census) (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)37.78 (3,032)38.5638.62
MetadataLink:Self-employed people (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)Self-employed people (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)5.9 (475)6.29.8
MetadataLink:Unemployed people (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)Unemployed people (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)4.91 (394)5.124.38
MetadataLink:Economically active full-time students (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)Economically active full-time students (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)2.49 (200)2.563.44
MetadataLink:Retired people (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)Retired people (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)18.45 (1,481)17.0913.68
MetadataLink:Economically inactive students (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)Economically inactive students (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)3.64 (292)4.095.8
MetadataLink:People looking after home/family (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)People looking after home/family (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)3.84 (308)3.844.36
MetadataLink:People permanently sick or disabled (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)People permanently sick or disabled (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)6.92 (555)6.674.05
MetadataLink:Other economically inactive people (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)Other economically inactive people (% of all aged 16-74) (2011)1.67 (134)1.862.19

Source: ONS - Census

Earnings

The earnings profile of a local area provides an indicator of the affluence of the local area as well as a measure of economic strength in terms of the prospects for well paid employment locally. Earnings data is available at Borough level only.

Unemployment

The table below provides an indication of the unemployment level (modelled estimate) locally (NB. Indicator not available if viewing Ward profile report). Unemployment estimates are based on a statistical model. Data is drawn from the Annual Population Survey, Labour Force Survey and supplemented by Jobseekers Allowance (JSA) data, leading to a more statistically robust dataset. There is a time lag in the publication of unemployment level data.

JSA claimants are not a direct measure of unemployment levels because not all people who are unemployed will claim JSA. However, there is a correlation between JSA claimant numbers and unemployment level. The table shows the JSA claimant numbers at the end of the most recent month.

Table: Key unemployment indicators
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Jobseekers Allowance claimants (monthly) (% of working age population) (08-2017)Jobseekers Allowance claimants (monthly) (% of working age population) (08-2017)1.1 (73)1.041.08

Source: Office for National Statistics (ONS)/Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

The table below shows the percentage of Job Seekers Allowance Claimants aged 18-24 years. The data is updated monthly.

JSA claimants aged 18-24 years
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Jobseekers Allowance claimants aged 18-24 (% of population aged 18-24) (08-2017)Jobseekers Allowance claimants aged 18-24 (% of population aged 18-24) (08-2017)0.00 (0)0.630.63
Source: Nomis

The table below shows the number and percentage of Job Seekers Allowance Claimants, who have been claiming this benefit for more than 12 months. The data is updated monthly.

JSA claimants (more than 12 months)
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Jobseekers Allowance claimants, claiming for over 12 months (% of working age population) (08-2017)Jobseekers Allowance claimants, claiming for over 12 months (% of working age population) (08-2017)0.39 (26)0.430.36

Source: ONS/Department for Work and Pensions. Published via Nomis

Incapacity Benefit and Employment Support Allowance are the primary benefits paid to people of working age (16-64 years) who are unable to work due to illness. The table below shows the proportion of people who are not in work and who receive key out of work benefits, showing national and regional figures for comparison.

Work limiting illness - Incapacity Benefit and Employment Support Allowance Claimants
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Incapacity Benefit claimants (% of working age population) (Q01 2017)Incapacity Benefit claimants (% of working age population) (Q01 2017)0.440.300.19
MetadataLink:Employment Support Allowance claimants Total (% of working age population) (Q01 2017)Employment Support Allowance claimants Total (% of working age population) (Q01 2017)10.519.235.62

Source: Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

Education and Skills

Educational Attainment

Educational attainment is an important part of preparing our children and young people for a successful, enjoyable and fulfilled future.

The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) is the framework for measuring the provision of learning, development and care for children between birth and the academic year in which they turn 5. The introduction of the EYFS was a significant landmark in education. The early years were given a distinct identity and a more focussed and detailed curriculum, where the emphasis is on learning through planned play activities.

There are 7 areas of learning and development that shape educational programmes in early years settings. These are (1) Prime Areas: Communication & Language, Physical Development, Personal, Social and Emotional Development and (2) Specific Areas: Literacy, Mathematics, Understanding the World and Expressive Arts and Design.

The level of progress children should be expected to have attained by the end of the EYFS is defined by 17 early learning goals, which sit within the 7 areas of learning and development. The Early Learning Goals include; Listening and attention, Understanding, Speaking, Moving and Handling, Health & Self-Care, Self-confidence & self-awareness, Managing feelings and behaviour, Making Relationships, Reading, Writing, Numbers, Shape, Space & Measures, People and communities, The World, Technologies, Exploring and using media and materials and Being imaginative.

Practitioners must indicate whether children are meeting expected levels of development, or if they are exceeding expected levels, or not yet reaching expected levels (‘emerging’). This is the EYFS Profile.

This dataset provides information on the average points score achieved by children across all 17 Early Learning Goals.

The table below shows the percentage of children achieving the expected level of development in the Early Learning Goals and the average point score across the Early Years Foundation Stage for all pupils, and a breakdown by girl / boy pupils.

The Early Years Foundation profile measures children's progress in terms of Personal, Social and Emotional Development (PSED) and Communication, Language and Literacy (CLL).

Early Years Foundation Stage
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
Average points score
MetadataLink:EYFS, Average Point Score  (2014)EYFS, Average Point Score (2014)33.9233.2033.80
MetadataLink:EYFS, Average Point Score, females  (2014)EYFS, Average Point Score, females (2014)36.0034.7035.10
MetadataLink:EYFS, Average Point Score, males  (2014)EYFS, Average Point Score, males (2014)31.7931.6032.60
Pupils achieving a good level of development
MetadataLink:Pupils achieving at least the expected level in all 17 Early Learning Goals (%)  (2014)Pupils achieving at least the expected level in all 17 Early Learning Goals (%) (2014)61.2359.0058.00
MetadataLink:Girl Pupils achieving at least the expected level in all 17 Early Learning Goals (%)  (2014)Girl Pupils achieving at least the expected level in all 17 Early Learning Goals (%) (2014)79.4468.0067.00
MetadataLink:Boy Pupils achieving at least the expected level in all 17 Early Learning Goals (%)  (2014)Boy Pupils achieving at least the expected level in all 17 Early Learning Goals (%) (2014)44.6349.0050.00
Source: Department for Education

Key Stage 2 (KS2) covers the four years of schooling in maintained schools in England and Wales, between Year 3 and Year 6 (children aged 7 - 11 years).

Key Stage 2 Attainment
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Pupils achieving Key Stage 2, Level 4 in Reading Writing and Mathematics (%) (2014)Pupils achieving Key Stage 2, Level 4 in Reading Writing and Mathematics (%) (2014)92.5583.0078.00

Source: Department for Education

The table and chart below show the proportion of people achieving expected targets at Key Stage 4 (GCSE).

Table: Pupil attainment: GCSE
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 (2013)Pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 (2013)6592,038567,612
MetadataLink:Pupils achieving 5 or more GCSE passes at A*-C (%) (2014)Pupils achieving 5 or more GCSE passes at A*-C (%) (2014)596466
MetadataLink:Pupils achieving 5 or more GCSE passes at A*-C, including English and Maths (%) (2014)Pupils achieving 5 or more GCSE passes at A*-C, including English and Maths (%) (2014)50.2754.9357.1
MetadataLink:Pupils achieving 5 or more GCSE passes at A*-G (%) (2014)Pupils achieving 5 or more GCSE passes at A*-G (%) (2014)909495

Source: Department for Education (DfE)

Adult skills

In a competitive job market, appropriate skills levels are key to people successfully securing and retaining work. Without the skills to secure work and in a difficult economic climate, individuals with no qualifications are at an immediate disadvantage in the recruitment process and may be passed over in favour of a better qualified candidate. Traditionally, the skills level, e.g. level of literacy and/or numeracy, of people living in the Borough is comparatively lower than the national average. Schemes to improve literacy and numeracy skills, e.g. Skills for Life, have been successful in recent years in reducing the number of people with low qualification levels.

Deprivation

The concept of deprivation is a wide one, covering a broad range of issues. Deprivation refers to unmet needs caused by a lack of resources and opportunities of all kinds, not just financial. It can therefore be defined through issues such as poor housing, homelessness, low educational attainment, lack of employment and worklessness, poor health and high levels of mortality.

The Indices of Deprivation attempt to measure this broad concept of multiple deprivation at small area level and provide a relative picture of levels of deprivation across the country.

In order to capture this picture the Indices use data from a basket of indicators within 7 distinct domains. Most indicators in the 2015 Indices relate to the financial year 2012/13. The domain indices are:

  • Income deprivation
  • Employment deprivation
  • Health deprivation and disability
  • Education, skills and training deprivation
  • Barriers to housing and services
  • Living environment deprivation
  • Crime deprivation

The data is examined at Lower Super Output Area level (LSOA), of which there are 32,844 in the country and 119 within St.Helens. LSOAs are designed to be of a similar population size, with an average of 1,500 residents each and are a standard statistical building block for dividing up the country. A relative score and ranking is then produced for every LSOA across each of the domains. This allows a comparative analysis of these 7 distinct dimensions of deprivation to be made across areas of the country.

It is important to acknowledge that the Index of Multiple Deprivation is a relative measure of deprivation. This means it can tell you if one area is more deprived than another, but not by how much.

Data has not been produced at ward level. However, the Indices of Deprivation 2015 Explorer shows ward and local authority boundaries, to allow users to view the deprivation ranks of neighbourhoods within these areas.

The Data and Resources section on this site, info4St. Helens also holds data tables and maps to view the Indices of Deprivation data.

Low income benefits

The working-age (16 - 64 years) client group are crucial to the labour market as they form most of the UK economy’s potential labour force.

  • Income Support is benefit paid to people who are not in full-time work, whose income falls below a prescribed level.
  • Pension credits is a means tested benefit for people over the age of 60.

The table below shows key low income indicators for the local area and comparator areas:

Table: Key low income indicators
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Working-age DWP benefit claimants (% of working age population) (Q04 2016)Working-age DWP benefit claimants (% of working age population) (Q04 2016)1,158 (17.38)16.0810.78
MetadataLink:Income Support claimants (% of working age population) (Q01 2017)Income Support claimants (% of working age population) (Q01 2017)172 (2.58)2.281.51
MetadataLink:Pension Credit claimants (% of pensionable age population) (Q01 2017)Pension Credit claimants (% of pensionable age population) (Q01 2017)433 (18.69)18.9116.09
Source: Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

Child Poverty

The impact on quality of life for children living in poverty can extend beyond the immediate issues presented by living in a low income household. Children who grow up in poverty often face a greater risk of having poor health, or being exposed to crime. As a result, their education is more likely to suffer, making it difficult for them to get the qualifications they need to get a good, well-paid job; and this in turn limits their potential to earn the money needed to support their own families in later life, and so a cycle of poverty is created.

The Households Below Average Income (HBAI) publication provides the definitive national measure of relative child poverty as set out in the Child Poverty Act 2010. HBAI is based on data from the Family Resources Survey meaning that the sample sizes are insufficient for useful analysis at the local level. The Children in Low-Income Families Local Measure provides a broad proxy for local-level analysis which can help explore the considerable variation in low-income rates that exists between and within regions and local authorities.

The Children in Low-Income Families Local Measure is the proportion of children living in families within the UK that are either in receipt of out-of-work benefits or in receipt of tax credits with a reported income which is less than 60 per cent of national median income. Out of work means-tested benefits include: Income-Based Jobseekers Allowance and Income Support. Where figures show income less than 60% of median income, these figures refer to children in families receiving tax credits where their reported income is less than 60% median income who are not receiving means tested out of work benefits.

Administrative data sources on benefits and tax credits from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) are used in the calculation of the Children in Low-Income Families Local Measure.

This measure should not be used to obtain a definitive measure of child poverty in any given area. However, it can reliably be used to explore variations in low income across the UK. The Commentary accompanying the Children in Low Income Families Measure provides more information about the methodology for this measure.

The table below shows the proportion of dependent children (aged under 20 years) living in a low income family.

Please note there is a considerable time lag before the publication of data, approximately one year following the end of the entitlement year in question. Most families have until July 31st following the end of the entitlement year to renew their award reporting their finalised income for the year in question. However, families that report income from Self-Assessment (e.g., the self-employed) have until January 31st of the following year to finalise their income. As a result, the full picture is not known until at least February the year after the entitlement year ends.

Children in low income families
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Children in low income families (local child poverty measure) - (% of all dependent children aged <20 years) (2014)Children in low income families (local child poverty measure) - (% of all dependent children aged <20 years) (2014)24.8 (N/A)24.219.9

Source: Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

Housing

Homelessness

Homelessness is a key driver of social exclusion and inequality. People are at greater risk of worklessness as they are caught in a 'no job - no home vicious circle', unable to get a job due to issues such as a lack of contact addresses or poor sleeping patterns.

NB. Homelessness data is not available below district level.

Housing market

Delivering high quality housing and meeting the housing needs of the local population is a key priority for the Borough.

The table below shows the mean price paid for all properties in the most recent month, the total price paid for all properties and the number of property transactions.

For more information please refer to DCLG Housing Market and House Prices.

Table: House prices
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Sum of total prices paid for all properties (monthly) (Mean price paid for all properties (monthly)) (06-2017)Sum of total prices paid for all properties (monthly) (Mean price paid for all properties (monthly)) (06-2017)100,000150,623294,912
MetadataLink:Sum of total prices paid for all properties (monthly) (Sum of Values) (06-2017)Sum of total prices paid for all properties (monthly) (Sum of Values) (06-2017)20011,5987,892,725
MetadataLink:Number of property transactions (monthly) (06-2017)Number of property transactions (monthly) (06-2017)27726,763

Source: Land Registry

The table below shows the number and percentage of households by type of tenure. Data is taken from the most recent Census survey.

Table: Households by housing tenure
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Households that are owner-occupied and owned outright (% of households) (2011)Households that are owner-occupied and owned outright (% of households) (2011)1,664 (35.4)33.2930.57
MetadataLink:Households that are owner-occupied and owned with mortgage or loan (% of households) (2011)Households that are owner-occupied and owned with mortgage or loan (% of households) (2011)1,589 (33.8)33.9832.77
MetadataLink:Households that are owner-occupied in shared ownership (% of households) (2011)Households that are owner-occupied in shared ownership (% of households) (2011)9 (.19).56.79
MetadataLink:Housing rented from Housing Association or Social Landlord (% of households) (2011)Housing rented from Housing Association or Social Landlord (% of households) (2011)794 (16.89)14.538.27
MetadataLink:Housing rented from private landlord or letting agency (% of households) (2011)Housing rented from private landlord or letting agency (% of households) (2011)231 (4.91)9.3215.42
MetadataLink:Housing rented from other (% of households) (2001)Housing rented from other (% of households) (2001)207 (4.4)3.093.22

Source: Office for National Statistics - Census

The table below shows the number and percentage of properties allocated to each of the eight standard Council Tax bands. Council Tax valuations are based on the price a property would have fetched if it had been sold on the open market on 1 April 1991. Please note, the data is locally derived and therefore regional and national comparators are not provided. Refer to the Valuation Office Agency for national data.

Table: Dwelling stock by council tax band
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Council Tax Band A properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)Council Tax Band A properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)32 (1,641)45N/A
MetadataLink:Council Tax Band B properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)Council Tax Band B properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)36 (1,814)22N/A
MetadataLink:Council Tax Band C properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)Council Tax Band C properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)21 (1,065)18N/A
MetadataLink:Council Tax Band D properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)Council Tax Band D properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)8 (409)8N/A
MetadataLink:Council Tax Band E properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)Council Tax Band E properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)2 (110)4N/A
MetadataLink:Council Tax Band F properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)Council Tax Band F properties (% of all properties) (02-2017) (17)2N/A
MetadataLink:No. Council Tax Band G (% of all properties) (02-2017)No. Council Tax Band G (% of all properties) (02-2017) (1).7N/A
MetadataLink:Council Tax Band H properties (% of all properties) (02-2017)Council Tax Band H properties (% of all properties) (02-2017) ()N/A

Source: St. Helens Council

Local Community

Crime and Anti-Social Behaviour

Co-ordinated partnership activity has seen steady decreases in crime and disorder over recent years. However, the public's perception of crime does not always reflect this success, as perceptions of crime may often be at odds with official statistics. As people are affected by what they see, hear or feel, negative perceptions around crime and disorder and the way in which it is being tackled can have a detrimental impact on people's quality of life. Issues such as vandalism, graffiti, drunk or rowdy behaviour and drug dealing can all feature high on the public radar, leaving them feeling unsafe. This demonstrates how important it is to increase public confidence, whilst continuing to tackle issues of crime and anti-social behaviour.

Anti-Social Behaviour

Anti-social-behaviour (ASB) is any any act causing harassment, alarm or distress that damages or destroys the quality of life of an individual or a community. It covers a broad range of actions or behaviours. Some of these can be classed as crimes such as vandalism, drug dealing or drunk or disorderly behaviour. Others may not be classed as crimes, but can still have a serious impact on an individual or a local community, actions such as dumping of litter or rubbish, verbal abuse, and noise disturbance.

In FY 2014 / 15 there were 21.9 incidents of ASB per 1000 population, reported to the Police. Targeted and specific interventions by the Community Safety Partnership (CSP), including Anti-Social Behaviour Orders, Dispersal Orders, youth diversionary activities and other preventative initiatives are all used to tackle ASB.

The table below shows the rate of Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB) incidents per 1000 population.

Please note that as the data presented below was provided by the Merseyside Police Intelligence Unit (St.Helens) it has not been subject to the same data quality checks as nationally published figures. Although the data should be considered robust and suitable to compare performance in particular Wards with performance of the Borough.

Anti-Social Behaviour Incidents
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Anti-social behaviour rate (per 1000 population) (FY 2014 / 15)Anti-social behaviour rate (per 1000 population) (FY 2014 / 15)21.937.8N/A

Source: Merseyside Police Intelligence Unit (St.Helens)

Recorded crime offences

Crime and fear of crime feature regularly as key issues afflicting individuals and communities. Crime can have a detrimental impact upon people's quality of life in a number of ways: individuals can be physically victimised (for example assaulted), materially victimised (for example burgled), or psychologically victimised (for example afraid to leave the house or walk alone after dark).

The negative effects of crime are not just restricted to those individuals who are personally victimised, but also transfer to friends, family, neighbours and colleagues. If left unchecked, these problems may become self-reinforcing, as more and more people in an area experience victimisation, either personally or via someone they know.

If such problems persist over time, a neighbourhood may gain a reputation as a dangerous place to live, resulting in population out-migration, which can further reinforce the cycle of decline.

Crime rates in St.Helens have reduced significantly in recent years. Given the ongoing budgetary pressures facing Merseyside Police, there will be undoubtedly be challenging times ahead in maintaining the crime reductions of previous years. However, the Community Safety Partnership is well placed to manage such changes, with robust multi-agency processes in place to coordinate initiatives and resource allocation via the Neighbourhood Action Groups in each Police Neighbourhood.

The table below shows the number of recorded crimes in St.Helens for the most recent time period.

Please note that as the data presented below was provided by the Merseyside Police Intelligence Unit (St.Helens) it has not been subject to the same data quality checks as nationally published figures. Although the data should be considered robust and suitable to compare performance in particular Wards with performance of the Borough.

The 2015/16 figures are under review and will be re-published as soon as possible.

Recorded Crime Offences
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Acquisitive crime rate (per 1000 population) (FY 2014 / 15)Acquisitive crime rate (per 1000 population) (FY 2014 / 15)7.711.8N/A
MetadataLink:Domestic violence rate (per 1000 population) (FY 2014 / 15)Domestic violence rate (per 1000 population) (FY 2014 / 15)15.916.9N/A
MetadataLink:Violent crime rate (per 1000 population) (FY 2014 / 15)Violent crime rate (per 1000 population) (FY 2014 / 15)9.813.0N/A

Source: Merseyside Police Intelligence Unit (St.Helens)

Local Transport Network

St.Helens has an extensive bus and rail network, providing regular connections to neighbouring towns and cities. It enjoys a strategic position at the heart of the regional road network, placed almost centrally between the core cities of Manchester, 15 miles to the east, and Liverpool, 12 miles to the west.

Access to services

The lack of access to suitable employment opportunities, education and training, advice provision, business support and other key services can contribute towards poor outcomes for those most at risk of experiencing deprivation. Poor access to services can be a particular issue for groups including lone parents, older groups, people whose mobility is limited or for those who live in areas where public transportation is poor.

The Borough covers an area of 136 square Kilometres, about half of which is designated greenbelt or open space. Households are defined as being 'significant' distances from key services if they are at least 6-8 km from the nearest service. In St.Helens and in each Ward, no household is judged to be more than 6-8Km from the nearest key service.

Access to transport

People without access to private transport are likely to experience barriers in accessing key services including hospitals, employment centres, supermarkets and other amenities (particularly in rural areas where distances to services are large and public transport provision is poor). National research has indicated that a lack of transport can contribute to social exclusion in urban areas and in rural areas can be the cause of social exclusion.

The table below shows the number and proportion of households by the number of car or vans owned. 44.29% of residents in Moss Bank Ward own one car or van.

There are now a reported 84,445 cars or vans belonging to households within St.Helens, a 14% increase since 2001. The increase in car ownership has a number of implications including greater congestion, pollution, increased pressure on the road network and the need for additional maintenance and increasing demand for parking provision, particularly on street residential parking.

Table: Vehicle ownership
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:Households with no cars or vans (% of households) (2011)Households with no cars or vans (% of households) (2011)24.72 (1,162)26.6925.8
MetadataLink:Households with one car or van (% of households) (2011)Households with one car or van (% of households) (2011)44.29 (2,082)42.6342.16
MetadataLink:Households with two cars or vans (% of households) (2011)Households with two cars or vans (% of households) (2011)24.93 (1,172)24.8524.66
MetadataLink:Households with three cars or vans (% of households) (2011)Households with three cars or vans (% of households) (2011)5.02 (236)4.585.46
MetadataLink:Households with four or more cars or vans (% of households) (2011)Households with four or more cars or vans (% of households) (2011)1.04 (49)1.261.93

Source: Office for National Statistics - Census

The table shows the proportion of people travelling to work by public transport (e.g. trains, bus, underground etc.) in the local and comparator areas.

Table: People travelling to work by public transport
Moss Bank WardSt. HelensEngland
MetadataLink:People travelling to work by public transport (% of all people aged 16-74) (2011)People travelling to work by public transport (% of all people aged 16-74) (2011)5.97 (476)5.710.95
MetadataLink:People who travel to work by Underground, Metro, Light Rail or Tram (% of all people aged 16-74) (2011)People who travel to work by Underground, Metro, Light Rail or Tram (% of all people aged 16-74) (2011) ().032.64
MetadataLink:People who travel to work by Train (% of all people aged 16-74) (2011)People who travel to work by Train (% of all people aged 16-74) (2011).91 (73)1.863.46
MetadataLink:People who travel to work by Bus, Minibus or Coach (% of all people aged 16-74) (2011)People who travel to work by Bus, Minibus or Coach (% of all people aged 16-74) (2011)5.05 (403)3.814.85

Source: Office for National Statistics - Census

Road Safety

The level of deaths and injury on the roads is a major concern. There is a key focus on improving road safety and reducing the number of fatalities and serious injuries, particular those involving children and young people, through a programme of engineering measures, education programmes and speed enforcement.

Environment

As a Council and with our partners, we are keen to protect our local environment, increase sustainability and reduce any negative impact we may be having on climate change. Some of the areas on which we are focussing include, improving waste management processes, improving the public transport network, reducing the energy consumption in public buildings, implementing air quality management plans and carefully managing our local conservation sites. These actions all contribute to protecting and enhancing the area in which we live and work.

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